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Department of Psychology

Hope to study the human brain? Feel called to serve people with physical, psychological, or social difficulties? Want to help a corporation or firm understand customers better? In the Department of Psychology at Indiana University Kokomo, you’ll get to study the basic principles of human behavior and cognition while learning to research, write, and speak effectively. We'll prepare you for all kinds of careers–making a degree in psychology very versatile and marketable.

I had an inaccurate idea of what research was, and I thought I couldn’t do it. I’m not good in math, and I was afraid of statistics. It totally changed my skill set, and gave me more confidence. I used to be intimidated by research, but now I love it. I have so many questions, and she’s taught me how to ask the questions and how to find the answers.

Shantel Galliard, B.S. '17, Psychology

We have lofty goals for our students; you’ll study a full range of topics like lifespan development, abnormal psychology, neuroscience, personality psychology, and social psychology. When you graduate, you’ll understand the major theoretical approaches to human behavior and cognition, have abilities to gather, analyze, synthesize, and apply your knowledge, have a healthy skepticism about conclusions presented without supporting data, and communicate effectively with a variety of audiences. At IU Kokomo, we offer a few different ways to study this subject. You can earn a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology, a Bachelor of Science in Psychology, or a minor in psychology.

You'll get the knowledge you need in the classroom and the experience you need out in the real world.

When you are a part of the Department of Psychology at IU Kokomo, you are preparing for your future. You’ll be encouraged to actively participate and get involved on campus, whether it’s in a practicum experience, an in-depth research project side-by-side with a faculty advisor, study-abroad opportunities, or in our student organizations. You can get involved with the Psychology Club and the psychology honor society for upperclassmen, Psi Chi. You can contact Professor Rosalyn Davis to be added to the Physchology Club’s email list!

A Lifetime of Success

Field trip harnesses psychology career ideas
In a barn near Cicero, Indiana, the psychologists and teachers have four legs. Jitterbug, a quarter pony, lead nine eighth-grade boys through lessons on leadership, assisted by human instructors. Psychology students from Indiana University Kokomo were able to observe a potential career in their field during a sophomore sojourn to Agapé Therapeutic Riding Resources Inc.
Research opportunities gives confidence
When planning her path to graduate school, Shantel Galliard intentionally chose the track that did not involve research. “I had an inaccurate idea of what research was, and I thought I couldn’t do it,” she said, “I’m not good in math, and I was afraid of statistics.” Less than a year later, with encouragement from Rosalyn Davis, clinical assistant professor of psychology, Galliard presented research at the American Psychology Association’s international conference in Denver — and also earned an A in her statistics class.
Psychology students learn empathy
On a cold winter morning, a line of students shuffles through the quad, each person with eyes closed, a hat pulled down over the face, or looking straight up into the cloudy sky. The line creeps like a caterpillar into Alumni Hall, slowing almost to a stop to navigate the stairs by the Library. Students follow one another by keeping hands on each other’s shoulders. In the lead, senior Mandy Bagwell calls encouragement to the 20 students following her. “It’s like dancing,” she says. “You mimic the motions of the person in front of you.”
Alumnae impact quality of life
“Mom.” It’s a simple word, one mothers may take for granted. But for the mother of a child diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), hearing that name is a hard-fought victory, and a treasured moment. Those breakthroughs are what fulfill Jacqueline Schick in her career as a registered behavior technician, working with children with ASD.
Last updated: 11/14/2017